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FACILITATION SKILLS MASTERCLASS SERIES
4 Online Sessions - 2019

 

 

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Comprehensive 2 day program runs next:

 

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May 20 & 21, 2019 

 

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October 3 & 4, 2019

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1 day practical workshop for your team
Build this powerful, influential skill to help make sense of change, communicate clearly and engage people in the most challenging situations
  

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SYDNEY - June 27

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or... contact Lynne to arrange a workshop at your workplace 

 
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    Entries in communication (28)

    Tuesday
    May142019

    Beware the thieves of clarity

    Are you tuned in to what steals clarity in your team, unit or organisation?

    Is it meetings?

    Lengthy reports?

    Status updates?

    Decks and presentations with complicated models, too much text, too many chevrons, arrows and ‘pillars’ or icebergs? ๐Ÿ˜œ

    The race is on for meaning and understanding. The sooner we understand, the sooner we can make decisions, get into action and get feedback and insights on that action.

    But how much might we hiding behind work, tasks and activities that actually steal clarity, create ambiguity and generate more confusion? Do we busy ourselves working on stuff that doesn’t really support clarity … but rather steals it?

    In this complex world, it’s better to be known for being able to cut through and get to clarity; not overly simplified, not dumbed down … just c-l-e-a-r. Today, be on the look out for the thieves of clarity. Don’t let them get away with it. Bring it back, hold onto it, keep it together because other people in the room, in the team, across the organisation need you to … stand up for clarity.

    What do you see that steals clarity and understanding in your world of work?

    Monday
    May132019

    Respect the old please

    'Push the new. Drive the change. Create urgency. Move on.'

    These phrases are part of transformation at work - everyone’s on 'a journey' and many a leader wants us to ‘move on’. Those labelled 'laggards', are derailing change efforts, resisting the new.

    But maybe it’s those who are 'pushing the new' who cause problems by resisting the old, not acknowledging the past. 'We’ve got to move on’ is so dismissive; I never use it in workshops or sessions.

    During change, it's vital to spend some time acknowledging and respecting the way things were. For longer-term employees, dismissing the past, asking them to move on could feel like their efforts are dismissed, their purpose, previous roles, the work they did and their commitment ... dismissed.

    Could we respect the old before moving on with the new, please?

    In Stockholm last week - speaking at the software architect's conference - I visited the ‘old town’; part of the city that’s been preserved, recognised and curated so that in the present day we can understand, learn and respect it.

    We learn where things come from, what it used to be like and it builds empathy and respect.

    What happens when we 'move on' too swiftly? 

    Monday
    May132019

    You will need all types

    You might like tables and spreadsheets, but other people don’t.

    We often default to our preferred way of communicating to influence, engage and bring people up to speed. But the problem is, it’s our default… not theirs. While we’re banging on with our information in ways that work for us, they’re sitting there going, ‘What the? Huh? Don’t get it yet.’

    In this world of cultural and linguistic diversity, and different ways of processing information, it serves us and them to pause before barrelling on with information.

    Thinking of your audience first can sound a bit cliched; it's often overlooked; we hope people will just ‘get it’.

    We must put information in ways, packages and modes that work for diversity.

    ๐ŸŽ So your spreadsheet, if you love it, may not work for others.

    ๐ŸŠYour list of dot points, that you love, may not work for others.

    ๐Ÿ‰ Your stories, may not work for others.

    ๐Ÿ‹ Your imagery, may not work for others.

    We need it all. Skim, step and fly across all of these styles. Heartfelt stories, captivating and clear imagery, meaningful data, useful lists. Don’t dwell anywhere, in any one sphere for too long. Bob across all types. Suspend the default.

    What's your preferred type of comms? 

    Thursday
    Apr252019

    The 4 words that show no - or low - empathy

    We know that empathy is a key way to build connections with people, deepen a conversation and strengthen trust. But I wonder ...do we too often confuse similarity for empathy?

    When someone shares a story or situation with you, and you’ve experienced it too, what do you say?

    We can too often rush in to sharing our story, our experience and our situation...because it’s happened to us too! Sharing similarities, finding common ground - sure, yes it builds rapport, connection. But don’t kill the opportunity for deeper connection and empathy in the rush to say your bit.

    These four words can kill empathy dead :

    Been There Done That.

    If you think it helps people feel better that you’ve done it too... pause...because it may not. That’s because it’s not validating their story or their situation they’ve just shared. It’s switched the focus to you.

    Empathy is not about being better, bigger, quicker, cleverer, the ‘winner’ or having done it or experienced it before them. Quieten down. Listen. Respond to what they’re saying without making it about you.

    Thursday
    Apr252019

    A real shortcut or perceived? 

    I went into a restaurant last night and the waiter said ‘One’, with a finger in the air like ’table for 1’; without seeing my response he took a menu, directed me to a table. ‘I’m here to collect a takeaway order’, I said.

    He took me to the counter, handed me the takeaway menu, opening it and pointing at all the tasty choices. ‘Thank you. I’ve already ordered via phone so I’m here to pick up.’ ‘Oh, of course’, he said.

    Three assumptions: Dining in, dining alone, need to order.

    We can see a lot of the same kinds of situations at work which can lead us to the perceived shortcut of assumptions. It’s more effective and human to pause assumption and go with what people present you with, what the need is right here, right now.

    This is relevant for leaders in conversations, meetings and workshops.

    Don’t assume people will move or change at the time, speed or direction you want. That’s an old outdated mindset of control. Rather meet them where they are and go from there.

    This is the newer mindset of facilitation. Contemporary, collaborative and effective, the Leader as a Facilitator. Give a like below; what's your experience with assumptions.. or takeaway?