Individual and Group Mentoring Program 


Your path to greater commercial value

Starting September 23, 2019 for 12 weeks

RESET your Value for 2020


-----------

September 17, 2019

The Railway Club Hotel in Port Melbourne,

Melbourne Australia 

12 - 2pm

 

Get tix via Eventbrite


 

 

 

 

ish:

The Problem with our Pursuit for Perfection and the Life-Changing Practice of Good Enough’

 

- my new book -

 

 

 

--------

Conference Keynotes 

Half, Full and Multi-day Learning Experiences 

Facilitated Programs

————————-

 

 Keynoting Speaker

at 

 

AGILE USA 2019

 

 

 

 

 

SIRF RT 2019

 

 

 

CPA Congress 2019 

 October 2019 

Perth

Brisbane

Melbourne

 Canberra

Sydney

Adelaide

 

Keynote & Workshop

 

 

 

————————-

New Opening Keynote

New Workshop

New 1:1 Skills Session

on



 

 

_______________________
 

 

 

Comprehensive 2 day program runs next:

 

MELBOURNE

October 3 & 4, 2019

 

SYDNEY

December 3 & 4, 2019

__________________

 

 

ONLINE PROGRAM

Series 2 in October/November 2019

4 x 1 hour online sessions

 

 

 

-----

 

 

 

 It's not 'drawing'...

It's 
VISUAL

SENSEMAKING

with Lynne Cazaly
using The Visual Mojo Method
 
1 day practical workshop for your team
Build this powerful, influential skill to help make sense of change, communicate clearly and engage people in the most challenging situations
  

Tickets via Eventbrite

MELBOURNE - September 11

PERTH - October 7


or... contact Lynne to arrange a workshop at your workplace 

 
____________________

 


 

 

 

 

Get the free Mini-Book on Sensemaking

This form does not yet contain any fields.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Join with me to receive & read my enews tips, templates and advice
    Read the latest
    and
    Subscribe to my newsletter  

    'Each week I delete plenty of enews and emails; this ain't one of 'em!' - Martin, Project Consultant
    'There is always something helpful, interesting, impactful in your enews Lynne. Love your work!' - Tim - Project Manager/PMO

    'Love it! A quick read with brilliant information, advice, support and ideas I can apply right away. Thank you.' - Jane, Team Leader

    Contact Lynne Cazaly

    e: info@lynnecazaly.com

    m: +61 0419 560 677

    PO Box 414, Albert Park   VIC   3206 AUSTRALIA

     

     

    Entries in sensemaking (30)

    Tuesday
    Sep102019

    You donโ€™t need to write (or type) it all 

    I’m talking cognitive load coping this week; how to handle all the information we’re exposed to.

    The times when we need to use cognitive load coping the most include training, meetings, conferences, conversations, coaching; whenever people are thinking and talking together and information is shared.

    This information can be:

    ๐ŸŒ• written: a report, presentation or a pack of information; or

    ๐ŸŒ• spoken: the verbal part of a presentation or conversation.

    Plus our own thinking process.

    We need to manage our own cognitive load better than we do.

    Here’s one of the biggest tips I can give you: You don't need to write (or type) everything down. We can write or type w-a-y too much information in an attempt to ‘catch’ or ’trap' what's happening and what's being covered. But some of the information may not be ‘worth’ catching or trapping! Yet we do it. And it makes our cognitive load worse.

    Notice the feeling of wanting or needing to catch and trap so much information. You don’t need it all.

    Are you a catcher or 'trapper' of information? Do you want to catch it all?

    Tuesday
    Sep102019

    The 2 things for better cognitive load management

    In their prediction for the skills we’d be needing now, by 2020, the Institute for the Future identified Cognitive Load Management in the Top 10.

    It's about how we cope with all that information.

    But it’s not one thing; I see Cognitive Load Management involving 2 capabilities:

    ๐Ÿ”น To discriminate + filter information for importance, and

    ๐Ÿ”ธTo understand how to maximize our cognitive function (using a variety of tools and techniques.)

    The answer is not about having a new app to manage, store or retrieve our own information better. We need to be able to firstly identify what’s important in the information we’re exposed to. And then we need to work with our own thinking, listening and sensemaking capabilities to handle that information better than we currently do.

    I’m helping teams (via 1/2 day workshops) and individuals (via 1:1 skills sessions online) to build skill and change the way they cope with information.

    It could be the best value session of your development program this year - being able to handle information better. What’s that worth to you? 

    Tuesday
    Sep102019

    We can make information overload worse 

    To handle the never-ending flow of information we face, it’s useful realising that the way we currently do things could be making it harder for us to take in information with ease.

    We can be so wedded to the automated and habitual way we do tasks: thinking, prioritizing, decision making, listening, note taking and learning, that we’re often blinded to the benefits and potential of newer ways.

    This is why some newer ways of working are known as ... new ways of working. Of course!

    I see this when I'm working with people, helping them manage their cognitive load. We’re used to our preferences (and we defend them), when we’re reading a document or listening to a presentation for example, yet we struggle with information overload and its effects. The devil you know, right?

    We tolerate the inefficiency and discomfort of overload. Many people wrongly believe it would be too hard to learn a new way or the benefits wouldn't be worth the effort.

    But newer ways of working are revealing better, easier and more effective ways of tackling all that information. 

     Would you be willing to try some new techniques to handle information overload? 


    Tuesday
    Sep032019

    Stop squirrelling information 

    I'm posting on information overload this week; one of my conference keynote topics, best scheduled at the start of the conference! Why? We're faced with so much information yet we haven’t evolved our abilities to process and cope with it all. We still get overloaded. Daily.

    An issue is how we squirrel away information intent on working on it 'later’, reviewing it, keeping it, having it. Think... at a conference where a tonne of information is presented via PowerPoint.

    How often have you got your phone out and taken a photo of a slide? We're creating a 'rework' problem though, collecting information we think we may possibly need, perhaps, maybe.

    'It looks valuable; I'll capture it.' It’s inefficient and delays the sensemaking task until 'later'. That's yet another thing for 'later'!

    Recent research confirms our memories and recall are NOT enhanced by these photos. We’re better off working with the information (listening, reading, thinking, writing) at the time, in the moment, even though it feels good to take photos.

    We think we feel calmer capturing the moment, but we're actually adding to the big problem that is our cognitive overload. Forget the photo. Make sense in the moment. 

    Sunday
    Aug112019

    Attention and focus

    Reporting in from Agile 2019 in Washington DC ... Author Chris Bailey kicked off the conference keynoting on how to manage your attention in a world of distraction. I

    t turns out we don't need to fit more content in, we need to create more space. Productivity he says, is a combination of time, energy and attention.

    We'd do well to take care of our energy. It was funny when he said that having a coffee now is borrowing our energy from later in the day. (Alcohol is borrowing energy and happiness from tomorrow!)

    But the key message is, we crave distraction - lasting just 40 seconds on a task before we get distracted - lapping up the dopamine hits we get from checking devices and drowning in screen-time. We need to let our messy minds wander; to rediscover boredom. It's over-stimulation which is the enemy of focus.

    As Chris spoke, I captured these rapid fire notes in this visual one-pager. Lots of information there and better than a list of boring writing that won't get looked at again. (I use visual notes like this to manage my cognitive load at conferences. It's only Day 1 of 5 - it's a marathon not a sprint!)  

    Yawn! How could you rediscover boredom ?